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minutes. >> thank you, orval, and senator for joining us today for our conversation about ian bremmer's wonderful new book. this book is about the g-0 world. he is a fabulous political scientist who really speaks to the big major changes underway in the world today, getting beyond the ivory tower. he has been making some money, which come as a fellow political scientist, i think this is a great tribute, but it also shows how politics and government are really driving so much of the global economy, so that the economists knowledge is really not sufficient, even for investors, as well as ordinary citizens to understand where we are going. this book is very interesting, we have this new concept of the g-0 world. it is really about the problem of global cooperation. it is not so much a book about the competition among nations. it is about the kind of leadership in the world today. i wanted to start off they may be telling us you really think that the united states has been an effective leader up until now, and that it is really -- it is really a loss of american leadership that this book
. >> an to calcutta, india. sex workers are barred from entering u.s. and holding alternative conference. we will take a look at the aids epidemic in black america and speak with congress member barbara lee of california. >> we need to make some noise. we need to put eradicating hiv and aids at the front burner of our political agenda, both here and abroad. >> all that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. syrian troops continue to bombard the city of aleppo in a bid to reclaim areas held by rebel forces. there have been reports of syrian helicopters backed by fighter jets firing from above, forcing hundreds of residents to flee. and allepo resident said syrian forces had fired indiscriminately, killing civilians. >> two brothers and their uncles were killed, another is between life and death. tend shells on a daily basis and this village has not had any sign of armed groups. we are targeted only because we call for freedom. >> speaking in washington, secretary state clinton said of killing of syrian president bashar al-assad is inev
diligence and hard work. i will never use drugs. the chinese team is extremely strict on doping control. so i can assure you that it is not an issue with us. and women's gymnastics, the team finals happening right now. if the u.s. wins, it will be their first team gold since 1996. we'll keep you posted on that one. i want to go back to the swimming. the women's 200 meter freestyle happening in about two hours. 17-year-old american missy franklin, she is taking on the world record holder, that is fredricka pell greeny of italy. in men's swimming, michael phelps could win two medals today. first up, the 200 meter butterfly. if he pulls it off, he jumps back into the pool for the relay. if he wins both, he'll have a record 19 olympic gold medals. wow. zain has the best assignment ever. wish i was there. missy franklin this young american swimmer. there is a lot to her story and some of it involves a little embarrassment for nbc as well. tell us what happened. >> yeah, it was a bit of a messup on nbc's part. basically they aired a promo of her saying that she had won gold in her first time ever
embarrassment for nbc as well. tell us what happened. >> yeah, it was a bit of a messup on nbc's part. basically they aired a promo of her saying that she had won gold in her first time ever here at the olympics, 100 meter backstroke. i watched it. it was really an amazing race. she did so well. but that promo on nbc then aired right before the race itself. so anyone who tuned in would have actually knew what the result was before they could actually watch it. so there has been all this outrage and nbc, you're spoiling the olympics for people. and hash tag came up callcalled called #nbcfail and everybody is complaining about this. what is interesting to note is that if this had happened four years ago, tape delays wouldn't have become such an issue. in the world of social media, twitter and facebook, everyone is getting results instantaneously. so the whole delay is causing a real issue for so many people, but, suzanne, you can watch it live streamed on nbc's website. so that's one option. and another option is just to go on a twitter, facebook, social media diet. and the other is to come to lon
assistance and no u.s. dollars and there were global fund dollars available for hiv and the prospects of her living and what she's doing now in her community because those dollars are at work there in her community are tremendous. there are 5.5 million people approximately in the world in low and middle income countries that receive hiv treatment and are on retrovirals because of foreign assistance programs funded by the united states and by other donor countries and especially the global fund. when we asked the question getting back to the title of the panel, to aid or not to aid. do i think we have to aid? yes, i think we have to aid. it is in the best interest as a country and it is our right and our responsibility as one of the world's global leaders. is it -- could it be more effective? absolutely. should we fund more? i think so, but right now we're living in a time in history where the world is changing more than ever before and millions of people still live in extreme poverty. we know that extreme poverty and social and economic conditions breed fear, hopelessness and terror, frankly
the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it is a major challenge to meet the standards of accountability and transparency. the exchange came during this unannounced stopover by the secretary of state. even if her words or encouraging, many i
.4% in the second quarter. there's a surprise 2.2% jump in inflation. >> hsbc is to post a jump. >> u.s. investors are looking ahead to a busy week. >>> okay. so welcome to the first trading day of the week. we're weighted to the upside one hour in the trading session for europe. after of course big rallies on the last few trading sessions of last week. the ftse 100 down half percent last week but up 2% the last three trading days. up 4.68% in the last three trading days. ftse 100 up. dax up two-thirds. the ibex today up another 1.75%. italy has got an auction out this morning. the auction focusing on -- i was going to show you three. but we got five and ten years very much in auction as well. 5.97% is where the ten year is trading. auction last month, the yield was 6.19%, lower today. the italian five year trading 5.28 at auction last month they hit 5 policy 84. auctioning up to 5.5 billion. yields in spain remain at 6.649%. hundred basis points lower. ten year bunds up to 1.4%. treasuries hit a record low. big week with the fed and employment report and of course the ecb, bank of england as well
, and he applies the brakes or uses the steering wheel to avoid the accident. >> host: why are you up here on capitol hill? what's the importance of showing this to politicians? >> guest: first of all, we think today everyone is distracted driving. we want people to be safer, we want to expose our -- [inaudible] to capitol hill. we think there are many people who can leverage that technology in order to help us save lives, to help us spread the word out there and to, you know, the families and the drivers -- >> host: is mobileye yet available? >> guest: mobileye is available for the consumers. right now we are working with several retail chains, and we are getting more and more into the retail market, and definitely. anyone who wants the system can e-mail us at mobileye.com, we'll hook him up with an installer. >> host: isaac litman is the ceo of mobileye here at the consumer electronics show in washington. stephanie lundberg is with the ford motor company, and you have a display here at the consumer electronics show. why is ford at this tech show? >> guest: essentially, ford is a technolo
in the foreseeable future. >> all right. stephane, thanks for that. joining us now for the first half of today's program, will oswald. thanks for joining us. how quickly is this unraveling? what's the next stage of this story? >> one of the things that we've been talking about for really some time now is that globally we're talking about something that looks a bit like a deleveraging black hole. what we mean by that you got across multiple different economies both in the private and public sector you got very large amount of debt levels that you need to bring down but of course over multiple years. this idea that we can get some quick adjustment, we have the process that goes through, everything is moving forward isn't going to happen. so when we look at a country like spain, if we look at it on a standalone basis, what can we do, looking at it in isolationist is the wrong way. spain is not sustainable. this is a workout process on a multiyear horizon. what provides you to step over "from the edge" is support whether it comes from the troika, they are going to greece this week, the ecb steppin
european blue chips including novartis. >>> positive earnings outlooks from u.s. tech giants ibm, e-bay and qualcomm. >>> smartphone tablet marketers power the world's big jegest ch makers. >> media reports say credit deutsche bank and hsbc are being investigated over alleged libor actions. >>> okay. so another show is under way this morning. >> you already had quite a busy day. >> kind of fascinating to me that this new launch of an exchange in london, in new york you had nyse and london will have more direct competition. >> what they will do, they will get companies that are already listed in europe and get them to come. >> easier to do it that way. >> so they get another pool of investors. something big has already start this morning. >> what do you mean? >> the opening championship. >> with golf. okay. >> under way. tiger tees off in 40 minutes. >> we'll bring that to you live. >> the lower house of parliament is due to vote on the spanish bailout. >> chinese banks boost lending in july. they plan to subsidize overseas development. we will find out where the money is flowing. >>
romney's running mate. we'll get the latest from u.s. campaign trail. >>> buy whatever the fed buys, whatever that might be as we chief to fixed income strategy at wells fargo advisers at 11:15 cmt. >>> shares in credit suisse are trading higher after they boost by 15 million francs. and carolyn is with us, she's on set. >> it would be handy if you were in zurich today. >> it would have been handy but you never know when the companies prerelease. credit suisse was slated to report those earnings next thursday. today because of what it is trying to do, it's trying to dispel downs about its capital levels. let me give you a little background because last month credit suisse bank came out in national stability report and criticized credit suisse about feeble capital levels saying it needs to raise capital levels. we saw shares trading at a 20-year low. we saw significant declines there. and credit suisse over the coming weeks has been trying to reassure investors about its capital levels came out with a statement saying second quarter was profitable. today, we've got that prerelease as
leaders are calling on the u.s. to officially declare boko haram a terrorist organization. >> george: and joining us with more from our washington studio is pastor ario, who heads up the pentacostal fellowship and serves as president of a r very important organization in nigeria, called the christian organization of nigeria. great to have you on the broadcast. the united states government is hesitating from classifying boko haram as a terrorist organization. do you think this is a good move by our u.s. government? >> it is definitely, definitely a wrong move. they should, and they should do it quickly. >> george: and why, sir? >> because, you see, one of the most important things in a terrorist organization is the finance, the money. and when they designate them as a terrorist group, then all the different security organizations will be able to track where the money is coming from. if you get the money, then you get the organization. >> george: some in the u.s. government say that this group is, in essence, trying to embarrass the nigerian government, embarrass the nigerian president
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with former u.s. secretary of state colin powell. the decorated four-star general has a new book that focuses on the lessons he learned along the way about life and leadership. the new book is called "it worked for me." will talk about the american wars abroad, the crisis in syria, and the 2012 presidential race, of course. we are glad you could join us. the conversation colin powell, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we allit's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: it is an honor to welcome colin powell back to this program. the former secretary of state and decorated four-star general is a best-selling author, whose latest book is called "it worked for me." he joins us from washington. secretary colin powell, good to have you back. >> good to be here, tavis. tavis: and a s
to release more key data including june figures tomorrow and second quarter gdp figures on friday. joining us now nor is associate director at taiji. walk us your biggest concern. >> clearly it's the eurozone and the united states, but just briefly on china you mentioned that the inflation data there was relatively slow. not necessarily. inflation itself, inflation or deflation doesn't really show necessarily how much the economy is growing or contracting. i mean certainly we know anyway that the purchasing managers index has been or producing price index as been going better. in part that's due to a drop in commodity prices so doesn't necessarily show you that the economy itself is slowing that much. in manufacturing as we know the figures for june were just about 50% but still that's not contracting either. in the u.s. who can be surprised that there's some issue with manufacturing growth, there's a lot of going to europe and united states. in june the service sector numbers, they were very strong and in fact you had the number coming in at 67.7, fastest growth in three months and 43% of th
nations involved, thereby, denying the united states an opportunity to intervene. but the u.s. has been pushing china to join a multi-lateral framework with asean claimants to draw up legally binding code of conducts. u.s. engagement with groups such as the asean regional forum reflects a shift in foreign policy under the obama administration. the asia-pacific is now the focus of american economic and military strategy. that means potential flash points including the south china sea are of increasing concern to washington, especially when it comes to the military presence of china. nhk world's anthony yazaki reports. >> reporter: u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton arrived in phnom penh on wednesday afternoon. the first item on the agenda was a meeting with the foreign minister from asean where they exchanged views on the region's most delicate topic, the territorial disputes over the south china sea. >> i ask in my country why i put so much emphasis on asean, i tell them we work with asean on issues of central importance to the united states from maritime security to economic growt
, this is a terrific opportunity, i think to have a conversation that all of us are looking forward to having, which is what are we supposed to make of this? let's not throw numbers at everybody. the focus of the discussion, steve has given us strict marching orders but take as a given the new aim of relative north american oil and gas abundance is upon us, and it's start to unpack the geo political implications of that. and obviously it's speculation but that's great. that's a washington sport we all excel at, so it makes for a pretty good conversation. it's such an all-star cast i'm not going to fill it up with long introduction but we have michael levi. adam sieminski issue the administrator of the energy information administration. ed morris, the globe head of commodities research at citigroup. ed chow, a senior -- >> it's an honor. >> robin west, the chairman and ceo of pfc energy. ed chow, who is a senior fellow at the center for strategic and international studies, and john hoffmeister, the founder and ceo of citizens for affordable energy and was the president of shell oil company. i can't t
numbers from tata consultancy services. the ceo will tell us how his company is managing under tough economic conditions. >>> we'll get goldman sachs' view on how the olympics will boost the uk economy. >>> and we'll speak to the ceo of monix to find out how much the percentage of u.s. investors investing in asia has declined. the answer to that question and more in just under an hour. >>> and we'll speak to a banking analyst in new york to preview, of course, those jpmorgan numbers. he says the stock is a buy at this level and expects today's report to provide closure and stability for the bank. >>> well, the world's second largest economy has grown at its slowest pace in three years. china's second quarter gdp rose 7.6% hurt by weak real estate investments and falling demand at home and abroad. retail sales and factory output growth also slowed in june. markets, though, rose on the back of the data as investors were relieved the figure wasn't worse than expected. joining us now is our guest host for the hour, jeff lewis, global market strategist at j pchpmorg asset management and a
. plenty coming up as we move throughout the next couple of hours. we're pleased you've come to yoin us to run through this journey we are about to embark upon. i'm getting a bit overexcited. >>> still to come on today's show, as i try to calm down a little bit, we'll be speaking to senior strategist between the relationship between australia and china and what it means for the aussie/dollar, what he think investors should expect in terms of further losses. >>> we'll preview the interest rate decision due in brazil as policy makers are expected to slash rates there to a record low. >>> indonesia is only one of the rapidly growing markets that one of our upcoming guests says will be the engines of global growth next year. find out which other countries she says fit the bill at 10:45 cet. >>> 11:35, 5:30 a.m. eastern, we'll head out to dallas to find out one why money manager is telling investors to look at distressed assets in u.s. as opposed to europe snooze the spanish prime minister has unveiled further austerity measures after warning growth will be close to zero in 2013. rajoy says
of interest. >> we'll see why japanese auto earnings are getting back on track. >> the cf buy join us first on cnbc after lifting guidance for the year. >> we're joined by guests at 11:30 european time. he says it could spike above 30 and hit 40. >> a set of disappointing results for two of europe's biggest banks this morning. the second kquarter profit was halved and ups numbers hit by a big drop in trading revenue and a significant loss on facebook's controversial ipo. carolyn, let's catch up with you, first of all. it's amazing how one flirtation can have so much of an impact. >> yeah, but, russ, that's only part of the story. let me run you through the numbers. you can't really sugar coat is because these numbers were much worse than expected, specifically in the investment banking unit which had a surprised pretax loss of 130 million swiss fra francs. it was the slump in trading revenues, and the fallout from the disastrous facebook ipo for which it is incurring a $350 million loss. ubs told us this morning it will take appropriate legal action against the action in dak for the, quote
, the president likes to say we're 4% of population, we consume 20% of the energy. the u.s. economy is 20% of the global economy and we use roughly 20% of the energy. that's about right. population is a demographic, not an economic input. and the fact of the matter is the whole narrative of the u.s. in the world, its role in the world, and our, as i say, the sort of selfish energy glutton, that's going to change as well. i mean, i think this is -- i do think this is on a scale of the berlin wall coming down, but i would also point out there's a book written after that came down called "the end of history" which was completely wrong. and i think that -- >> maybe it was just ahead of its time. >> way ahead. the fact of the matter is a lot of thought, in a lot of places around the world, tremendous decline rates. the notion there won't be tightness in oil markets globally, i think there will be tightness in markets. i think that certain technologies, renewable technolo technologies, they may not work here because gas prices are so low. they might work in a lot of other places. i think -- it
. >> knowing that your positive, they're going to shame you, discriminate against u.s. and so forth, so people shy away. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. samangan of forces are continuing their bombardment of the city of aleppo ahead of a widely expected all-out assault to uproot rebel fighters. hundreds of troops are said to have massed on the city's outskirts as syrian gunships pound several neighborhoods. rebel forces have launched attacks on army checkpoints around the city. a number of people were reported dead in clashes on thursday, the exact amount is impossible to verify. in washington, state department spokesperson victoria nuland said the u.s. fears a new massacre in aleppo will occur. >> the concern is we will see a massacre in aleppo, and that is what the regime appears to be lining up for. aleppo, as you said, has been bombarded by syrian fighter jets. it is the latest desperate effort of the al-assad regime to hold on to control. there are credible reports of tanks prepared to attack the cit
u.s. officials are now bracing for the prospect of assad falling, or regime control of damascus collapsing on a much swifter timetable on previously contemplated. even one as short as 36 hours. >> this is a situation that is rapidly spinning out of control. for that reason, it's extrem extremely important that the national community working with other countries have concerns in that area have to bring maximum pressure. on assad. to do what is right and step down and allow for the peaceful transition. >> we call on our friends and our partners internationally to recognize that assad is a spent force hecht will not be a part of syria's future. >> at the united nations, plan to vote on a new security council resolution deferred until thursday. western intelligence agencies armed with sketchy information looked for signs of more high level defection and continued rebel momentum. >> we have seen other indications that maintains the control over the armed forces generally. he could decide however to try to mount a counter offensive, even using chemical weapons. that could extend the b
that iranian oil output is falling in june to near 22 year lows as well. bringing back info use supply disruption that they are pointing out. let's just get a comment here from the head of research at orient financial markets. thanks for coming along. the iaea talking about oil demand. we get a read through sort of the global economic picture as well, talking about this muted recovery in global economies in 2013 and a very small increase in oil demand from 2012 into 2013. does that square with your global view of how the economies are likely to recover? >> yes, pretty much. i think what we've seen from china, what we saw korea today in terms of rate cuts, the japanese are holding steady because they already are at zero rates and not a whole lot more to do but the central banks certainly tend to agree with the assumption about the global slow down and it's inevitable under those circumstances that oil demand will go down. certainly from our part of the world here, there's no question that the amount of oil that we expect to be consuming for the remainder of this year and 2013 is not goi
a special interest and relationship to south of the border. many of us have familial relationships. some recent, some past culture language. and i don't believe that this country has ever really focused on these attributes that could be a benefit to the united states coming and why today i think the timing couldn't be better. the growth of the latino community in the united states is the largest minority group in the united states. its voting power has been increasing tremendously and i do think that looking at south of the border there are opportunities, positive opportunities that benefit this country by a closer alliance and closer relationship. as an example, i don't think americans truly understand the significant changes that have occurred both domestically and internationally south of the border that would benefit paying more attention. as an example, the evolution and the strengthening of democracy in certain important large countries in south america and central america mexico, colombia, brazil. you know, we have cemented the space ideals of a space form of government, and coupl
's nomination, how far will he go to win the white house? will ferrell and zach galifianakis are with us like to talk about their new movie. wolf blitszer is off. i'm joe johns. you're in "the situation room." >>> right now mitt romney's on his way home from an overseas trip his campaign is calling a great success even though it generated embarrassing headlines at every stop. latest came today in poland when one of romney's top aides cursed at reporters asking questions. one of them was our jim acosta, who joins us from warsaw. jim, what happened today that the romney team sounds upbeat despite all that's been going on? >> reporter: well, joe, a senior romney advisor told reporters here in warsaw that mistakes do happen out on the campaign trail. but when asked what mistakes were made on this overseas trip, that advisor couldn't name any. instead the campaign says the world got to hear from a candidate who they say speaks from the heart. it's the image mitt romney has wanted voters to see for the last week. the gop contender walking tall on the world stage here visiting poland's tomb of the u
into that fund today, those dollars go elsewhere without us having a say until we participate or become part of the treaty process. does that clarify? >> thank you. >> the other thing that i wondey have been covered to some extent, but i haven't heard much discussion since i arrived about how we benefit in the arctic. you talked that a little bit mr. gerard in terms of our ability to have much more of an opportunity to access the minerals and the resources under the arctic. .. the outer continental shelf. we stand here watching that happen we have a very, very significant interest in the arctic. as i mentioned earlier, shall hopefully will start that today. seems that one quarter of the world's oil and gas resources are into the arctic. why we would sit on the sidelines and watch the rest of the world development resource to us is somewhat mystified within our own 200-mile exclusive economic zone in the world that does not take full advantage of the outer continental shelf a big miss the opportunity to sit back and watch 30 years from now we missed on this decisions we made in the arctic whi
in british banking, which is what the british public want to see. >> joining us is bank equity researcher at lie brum capital and the guest host for the hour. vice president of wells management, singapore for ocbc bank. core mack, first to you, this decision a surprise? >> not really actually. there was a story in the ft overnight saying that bob diamond was threatening to reveal embarrassing details and if he was pushed. when things descend to those levels, it's inevitable that the ceo is on the way out. >>> is this story about the bba, the bank of england and those -- >> my cynical view is that he's being used as a scapegoat. if you tried to settle the issue over the last five or seven years, which is the time in which to some extent the distortions were occurring, you would start to have systemically claims. given we're in a economic slowdown, there's a reason for regulators to turn barclay's and mr. diamond into a scapegoat and hopefully the lybor issue you will die away. >> look, it was four years ago that they brought the issue to light with regulators. it's been going on for quite
? >> definitely seen gradual changes as i'm sure you have. look, i've had to use my former cheerleading voice many times to get a question to presidents and to candidates for president. but i've had to do that more and more as has jim over the years because, look, i mean it's just the world that we live in from their perspective that with twitter, the internet, with everything going viral immediately, it's hard for them to say anything without altering the message that they're trying to get out that day. having said that, it is frustrating having been a reporter on several presidential campaigns, you're there, you're going on the bus, you're going off the bus, you're sitting through every speech. and you want to have access to the candidate to be able to ask them questions. and especially at the end of a trip like this where you're really going full bore and you don't have a chance to ask anything, that's what happens when you really try to ask. and you have to be careful of your surroundings, but you got to do your job. >> gloria, and i have to ask you, in the big picture, how important is this r
-span2 and 3. from houston's first baptist church joel rosenberg note reflect on whether the u.s. can recover from its economic and spiritual decline. it is about two hours. [applause] >> thank you. what a joy to be here in houston at houston's first baptist and i want to thank this church and the pastor for hosting us and making this possible. i want to thank all the churches that are participating all over the country. we have churches and small group bible studies and home village of groups in 42 states around the united states as well as in canada, india, new zealand who are participating. god bless you. for the next three hours we will look at issues that are sobering to say the least and we will take questions from those of you here at houston's first baptist but we also want to take questions from those around the country. and the three hours we have here. we would love for you to tweet those questions. some of you already have but you can tweak in your questions during the event. even those of you who want to get to the microphone and you can do that, j.c. are/traffic. @j.c. a
a study out of australia show that men use navigation more than women. they use it compared to just half of the women surveyed. you can read the entire story on phil lebeau blog. "closing bell" is coming up next, see you tomorrow. >>> i have never seen a woman in road rage, ever. >> i have, absolutely. full of a car of kids and dogs and things like that. welcome to "closing bell." i'm filling in today for maria bartiromo. she will be back tomorrow. >> the fed will issue their latest policy statement tomorrow, and investors not taking any chances ahead of that, taking this wait and see mode. most of wall street not expecting any major fed action, but the bulls could get a rude awakening if bernanke and company don't often any more clues. investors are a bit jittery today despite positive economic data. look at the zigzags. that is an indecisive moment right now. the market is down, and the chart show it's positive, and the s&p down 3.6 points. will they or won't they. that is the question investors are requesting about the fed's next move right now. they made their guess, so now it's
us at: captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org masterpiece is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. we are pbs. >> welcome to the program, tonight ratan tata chairman of the tata group and judith rodin president of the rockefeller foundation on the occasion of the presentation of the lifetime achievement award from the rockefeller foundation to ratan tata. >> when you live in a country where there's such disparity of income and such disparity and prosperity, you cannot help but feel that you cannot ignore the millions of people that sometimes struggle for just staying alive. in that you need to do something to not to hand out-- but to bring life back to them. so i think what has been happening in enlightened companies is do something for the communities around where you are operate. >> rose: we conclude this evening with jane harman, former congresswoman from california now president of the woodrow wilson center. >> i think the way to solve the terror threat against us is to win the argument. and how do we win th
scholar focusing on retirement issues for the americanthank yog with us. >> thank you. >> tomorrow, "washington journal" we look at the implications from a recent supreme court decision striking down a ban on political money in local elections. christopher wilson discusses the president of election in mexico and what it means for the u.s. alan fisher talks about how al jazeera's network covers american news around the world. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. leon panetta said the military plans to deploy units to strengthen security capabilities around the world. he delivered remarks on a new defense strategy that focuses on a more collaborative approach to meet security challenges in the future. he also spoke about the need for the department to invest in cyber security and space. this is a little under one hour. >> we welcome me care for a very special presentation. -- you here for a very special presentation. it is my pleasure to welcome the chairman of the board of the institute of peace, robert west. [applause] >> thank you. ladies and gentlemen, i am c
the fast judicial overreaching on the one hand not to mention, "of verbal wizardry that took us too far, too deep into the forbidden land of the softest that's obviously not the leverage that we typically read in these opinions. so the affordable care act having survived one near-death experience now moves on to what may be the next one, the november elections. but even the very strong language that was of waste by the dissenting justices, and in some instances by the chief justice himself, we now know what a majority of the court thinks the government cannot compel us to do something we are not doing already unless it calls a tax in which case it can and in which case tam put it on the health affairs blog yesterday millions of americans were able to go to sleep last night secure in the knowledge that the federal government cannot meet you eat broccoli. [laughter] we move on now to discuss a little bit more in detail and in depth with the decision said and what it means going forward not just for the field of constitutional law but for all the other concerns i mentioned. and we have a v
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. as u.s. and european defense spending contracts, a top bae systems executive tells us about where his company is going to find growth on global export markets. plus, how one military service organization is changing how it supports military members and veterans. >>> but first, the looming threat of sequestration and whether the pentagon will be forced to cut another $500 billion if congress fails to strike a daily by january 2. defense secretary leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general marty dempsey say cuts would be devastating to capabilities. industry executives warn unless congress resolves the crisis they will be forced to lay off thousands, starting a chain reaction that could cost up to 2 million american jobs. panetta was so concerned that just a few weeks ago he summoned some of the nation's top defense executives to washington to discuss the problem. dennis muilenburg, the ceo of boeing's space business was mog those who spoke with panetta. we recently caught up with him at the
candidate. governor romney, thanks so much for joining us, in jerusalem. what a beautiful city. i'm sure you've been moved by what you've seen so far. >> it's a holy city, a city of a great and courageous people. my wife and i first came here in 1995 and have been here four times now. we're moved and inspired by what we see here. >> do you consider jerusalem to be the capital? >> yes, of course. jew res l >> would you move the embassy to jerusalem? >> it's long been the policy of have the nation's embassy in the capital. if i were president, i would want to take it in consultation with the leadership of the government, which exists at that time. so i would follow the same policy we have in the past. our embassy would be in the capital. but the timing of that is something i would want to work out with the government. >> with the government of israel? >> with the government of israel. >> but every government has asked them to recognize them. >> well, that would make the decision easy, but i would still want the communication with the government leaders. >> just to be precise. if you were presi
so and select the timing in accordance with the government of israel. >> you know that every u.s. president since '67, since the six-day war in 1967, behind you in the old city of jerusalem, you see the beautiful walls there, and we're not far away. but the line was in front of the old walls. but since then every president from nixon to lbj, carter, ronald reagan, bushes, president clinton, now obama considers east jerusalem, including the old city behind you to be occupied territory. not part of israel. would you change that? >> i'm not going to talk about the borders. the decision as to where the borders would be as we move to a two-state solution, which i support. that's a decision on borders that will be worked out by israelis and the palestinians. i hope it's a process which is ongoing and ultimately successful. as to the exact negotiation in borders, i'll leave that to the deciding parties themselves. >> you just visited the western wall. one of the oldest sites in jerusalem. we saw the pictures, the video. do you consider that to be part of israel? >> it is certainly part
's going on in this case now. >> ed lavandera on the scene for us as he's been right from the beginning. thank you. elsewhere, in maryland, police say the fbi are now investigating an abduction with ties to the baseball legend cal rib ken jr. his mother was found safe this morning almost 24 hours after being taken from her home at gunpoint. cnn's lisa sylvester's working the story for us. what happened here, lisa? >> hi there, wolf. what we know is this all started about 7:00, 8:00 yesterday morning when a man apparently approached and went to violet ripken's house and abducted her at gunpoint. he then according to authorities spent most of the day driving around in her car throughout central maryland. and it was only until around 8:30 last night when there was a citizen in the neighboring county, in baltimore county, who saw a suspicious vehicle. he called it in to county authorities. and at that point it was that tip that eventually led to violet ripken being found this morning unharmed back near her house in aberdeen. she was however bound. authorities at this point are not clear wha
. >> all right. our next scene is going to move us from story telling that took place during the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye brows and
for joining us on worldwide exchange today. happy holidays if you are in the states as well. we're just looking out for figures from the eu. services pmi numbers for the eurozone as a whole. we've had some of the broken down numbers. this is the eurozone as a whole. june services pmi came in at 47.1. 47.1. so below that sub 50 level which indicates contraction. but a bit better than had been expected. the forecast was for 46.8. came in at 47.1. also an improvement on last month when we had 46.7 was the reading. so better than expected. and an improvement on last month for the eurozone as a whole. >>> now at 1500 cet or 2:00 p.m. london time, bob diamond will appear in front of the security treasure. the question could be the role played by paul tucker. this after barclays released a memo between tucker and the ex-ceo of barclays. he's expected to mount a defense of his organization and that of his former employer. the outgoing chairman marcus aigis explained why he decided to leave just one day after his resignati resignation. >> he saw the public interest in this whole area had not red
this can re-scramble the u.s. economy, you know, in this positive way, or, perhaps, in not so positive of a way? are we going to become a new -- an energy state? going to become trapped in the resource curse? >> well, in many ways this question of energy independence, wherever it takes you, wants to get there, we already are a net exporter of coal. we don't really import a lot of electricity. eia forecasts that we'll be a net export of natural gas by 2020, and we had a very thorough discussion of the potential on the oil side. as the only federal employee on this panel -- >> see, i didn't ask you whether you thought president obama would benefit from this. >> i would say that the role of the federal government has not been, i don't think has been as negative as some have characterized it. natural gas and oil and hydraulic fracturing, a lot of the 3-d seismic technology used in this got its start in federal labs. the independents that were responsible for the breakthroughs in natural gas fracturing were helped tremendously by a federal subsidy on natural gas production. it was a dollar
in mexico and what it means for the u.s. later, al jazeera english correspondent alan fisher talks about how al jazeera's english news network covers american news in the united states and around the world. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] host: good morning, it is monday, july 2, 2012. right now you are looking at the shot of the pentagon in arlington, virginia, as we spend the first 45 minutes talking about recent changes to the role of women in combat. the department of defense recently opened up 14,000 military jobs closer to the front lines that have previously been closed to women. but critics are questioning whether the military have gone far enough. as we discussed those efforts of this money, we want to know what you think. give us a call -- a very good monday morning to you. we should note that congress is away from washington this week for the fourth of july recess, but it is still going to be an important week politically with the fallout from the supreme court decision a
claim the shared identity and cherish and celebrate our unique a daddy's and using those the skiffs to enrich the human community in critical areas like poverty and the environment and the mediation of conflict hoping to raise children with the new awareness of their neighbors so instead of recapitulating ancient animosity which city the people growing up with this sense that you're my neighbor came have a different faith and they believe different things we are neighbors and we could work together and are on ways to make committees better. >>> will talk more about the nine religions initiative right here coming up in a moment >>> in 1993 the then bishop a episcopalian bishop of california, was asked to put together something for the united nations celebration to interface sort of thing is still going on today. charles gibbs is with this asking about the goals of the united indigence initiative and a couple of examples of the projects may be. >>> one of the things we believe is critical is that we raise and a new generation of young leaders so we have a young leaders program that
have said to me, how do we make it better with a sibling? what changed for us was the first thing that happened is, this is now my rule 1, take action. i flew out to the orchards, i panicked after 9/11. i would never get this better. what was i going to do? like everyone in new york and america, we were so traumatized with 9/11. i said to my husband, i am going to go out to the orchards. >> this is before you knew he was sick? >> i knew. he was still going full speed and no one would have known he was sick. he wasn't really sick, he just had his medical condition. i said i am going to go surprise him. i spent 2 days. >> simply because the world is coming to an end? >> i felt compelled. it was the moment i knew i had to turn the page. you just know. there is something that happens to you, i am going to turn the page. i was panicked. i was surprising him, he would have said no, i am too busy, i don't want you here. i spent a day running all over new york city trying not to freak out about the sirens buying flannel clothes, the right things for the orchard. this is ridiculous, i wear
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